North Korea Calls Trump’s ‘Fire and Fury’ Bluffs

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Military parade in North Korea

North Korea’s recent moves have shown that Pyongyang is unimpressed with Trump’s explosive rhetoric. Last month, Trump threatened to hit the rogue state with “fire and fury” if it continued its nuclear tests, but the country recently resumed anyway.

On Sunday, Kim Jong Un approved a powerful nuclear detonation following a series of nuclear launches that nearly hit Japan. Kim thinks Trump is bluffing, so he sees no harm in continuing with the provocations.

The U.S. is interested in preventing Kim from developing an intercontinental ballistic missile (IBM) that could hit its mainland. With each test, Pyongyang is getting closer to that goal, so time is running out.

Every time Washington tried to intimidate the hermit state with condemnation, shows of force, and military drills, North Korea defied the U.S. All previous three administrations failed to put an end to the isolated country’s nuclear program.

Trump Approach Is Unproductive

Some military analysts have hoped that a “fire and fury” approach would be better than pressure and diplomatic maneuvers in ending the communist regime’s missile program.

Trump, however, takes things personally when it comes to Kim, so many national security experts are concerned the situation may escalate to a nuclear war. Former National Security Agency director Michael Hayden told CNN Sunday that the President’s national security team found the perfect way of discouraging North Korea: coaxing the Chinese.

China is North Korea’s most significant ally, so it could use its influence to alter Pyongyang’s military decisions. A souring relationship with China would hurt North Korea both economically and militarily.

Hayden thinks that the Trump administration has “inartfully executed” this strategy, and warned a showdown with North Korea is unproductive and dangerous. The former official added that he is concerned about the “stray electron” or an early morning tweet that could deepen the nuclear crisis.
Image Source: Wikimedia

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